Archive for October, 2017

Highlands Ranch High students to perform with noted musician

Column by Sonya Ellingboe

When recording artist/composer and original member of the Trans-Siberian Express Mark Wood comes to Highlands Ranch High School on Nov. 10 with his Viper electric violin, the student musicians will be transformed into a rock orchestra for a day. Wood and orchestra director Ryan Woodworth will teach the students improvisation, composition and personal expression on their string instruments, as well as Wood’s special arrangements. Wood will play his violin with them through the day. By the time evening rolls around, the HRHS orchestra students will perform a live concert: it’s set for 7 p.m. Nov. 10 in the school auditorium, 9375 Cresthill Lane, Highlands Ranch. Tickets: $10, bit.ly/2yuocny, 1-866-967-8167.

Meet the authors

The Castle Rock Writers, who recently published “Images of America: Douglas County,” will host a Meet the Authors Reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Nov. 12 at the Philip S. Miller Library in Castle Rock, 100 S. Wilcox St. Seven of the eleven authors will be on hand to serve an English tea, in honor of British ancestors — and greet community members. Members of the regional writing group researched, wrote and found photos during the past year and the book was published Aug. 28. They found oral histories and unique photographs, interviewed descendants of pioneers and others in the community. Elizabeth Wallace, a CRW founder, and Alice Aldridge-Dennis, current president, acted as project managers. Information: castlerockwriters@gmail.com or Alice Aldridge-Dennis, 303-521-8615.

Holiday Bazaar

Englewood’s Annual Holiday Bazaar will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 4 at the Malley Recreation Center, 3380 S. Lincoln St., Englewood. Admission is free; concessions available for purchase.

Columbine Library opens

Jefferson County’s Columbine Library, 7706 W. Bowles Ave., Littleton, reopened Oct. 28, after being closed for remodeling. 303-235-5275.

Fivers at PACE

“Dinner at Five,” a world premiere comedy by Lloyd J. Schwartz, will be presented by Fivers Inc. at the PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave. in Parker, from Nov. 14 to 19. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; 2 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. Tickets: $36-$39, parkerarts.org or 303-805-6800.

Parker Artist Guild

The Parker Artist Guild will feature works by 46 painters and sculptors who work in a variety of mediums: oil, watercolor, pastel and mixed media, photography, clay, stone, bronze. This is the first time the Guild has put out a call for an open show. The exhibit was juried by PACE Center curator Rose Fredericks and artist Mark Nelson, who lives and works in Parker, will select award winners. The opening reception will be 6 to 8 p.m. Nov. 3, with artist in attendance, food, music, cash bar. PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., Parker.

Tactile Art

Arapahoe Community College will host “Shared Visions,” a tactile art exhibit, in collaboration with Colorado School for the Blind, from Nov. 9 to 22. Art is fully accessible, multi-sensory, tactile. Colorado Gallery of the Arts at 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton, is open 9 a.m to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, with Tuesday hours until 9 p.m., and an opening reception will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Nov. 9. Admission is free.

Cat in the Hat, etc.

“Seussical, the Musical” opens on Nov. 10 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., Littleton, directed by Bob Wells and choreographed by Kelly Kates. Donna Debreceni is music director. Renew your acquaintance with that Cat in the Hat, Mayzie La Bird, Horton the Elephant and others. Ideal family fare for the holidays, it runs through Dec. 30. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays and Nov. 25 and Dec. 2; 6:30 p.m. Dec. 10. No show on Dec. 24. Tickets: $26-$46, 303-794-2767, ext. 5; townhallartscenter.org/seussical.

‘Beau Jest’

The comedy “Beau Jest” by James Sherman plays Nov. 9 to Dec. 10 at Cherry Creek Theatre at the Jewish Community Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Performances: 7 p.m. Thursdays and Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays; 7 p.m. Sundays Dec. 3 and 10. (No performances Thanksgiving week.) Tickets: $30-$35, cherrycreektheater.org.

Jewelry for sale

The Denver Women’s Press Club holds its Annual Jewelry Sale on Nov. 18 (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) and Nov. 19 (noon to 4 p.m.) at the Denver Women’s Press Clubhouse, 1325 Logan St., Denver. Bernadette Fuentes, bead maker, will hold a trunk show. Proceeds go to support scholarships for journalism and creative writing at the college level.

No Comments

Football a kick for high schooler off to Baylor

Attachments

Column by Jim Benton

Issac Power gave up kicking a soccer ball when he was a freshman at Ponderosa. Instead, he started booting a football.

Power is now one of the best punters, kickoff specialists and placekickers in the state as a senior and will be a punter in the Jan. 6 U.S. Army All American high school game in San Antonio.

“I did soccer for 10 years or so and my Dad said enough, play football,” recalled Power who admits he likes putting best. “I guess I just liked it. I can’t kick a soccer ball now to save my life but I can kick a football better. My foot just naturally likes it more.

“It wasn’t soccer that got me my strength because we used to go hiking all the time. That’s where my strength came from. And I’m very flexible. But soccer is always a good background to have for kicking.”

Power missed his sophomore season because of an ACL knee injury to his kicking leg but worked hard and is rated as the fourth best punter in the class of 2018, according to kicking expert Chris Sailer.

“Issac in my opinion has been the best kickoff specialist in the state for two years and probably the best field goals kicker and punter in the state,” said Ponderosa coach Jaron Cohen. “He can handle all three — kickoffs, field goals and punting. He is 6-foot-2, 180. He’s not a small kid. He has a big leg and big frame. Clearly he’s a pretty special talent.”

In statistics through eight games, Power is averaging 40.2 on 19 punts, with 10 landing inside the 20-yard line. He had made eight of 11 field goals, including a 58-yarder, and is averaging 60 yards on 54 kickoffs with 51 touchdowns.

Power, who admits he has worked more on placekicking than punting, describes himself as a kicker and punter and didn’t have much trouble adjusting to the pressure of onrushing football defenders.

“I just see the ball,” he said. “That’s all I’m looking at and just tune everything out.”

Power was surprised by the attention shown him by big-time colleges. Schools like Alabama, LSU and Colorado were interested but he has committed to kick for Baylor.

He recalls how his dad was concerned about paying for his college education.

“I’d say don’t worry, I’m going to college for free,” said Power. “And lo and behold, it actually happened. There’s no way I thought I’d ever be this good.”

It’s a small world

No, I haven’t been to Disneyland or Disney World recently, but it is sometimes a small world.

I met Gabe Trujillo, who is the director of athletics/activities and human resources for the Westminster Public Schools district.

Turns out that Trujillo was a three-sport athlete at Lincoln High School, where I attended years before Trujillo. He knew a few of the same teachers and coaches that I knew.

Trujillo, who played basketball at Western State and Metro and has been employed as a coach and high school administrator for years, now has a big job. He is the AD for a district with one high school and he wants to get Westminster High School competitive again.

His game plan is improved scheduling, which could be helped at least in football with the new league alignments for the next two-year cycle. And he wants to enhance program development in all sports with off season training and promotion.

Unbalanced schedule

If anyone needs reinforcement about the need to change the current Class 5A football league alignments for the next two-year cycle, a glance at the first-place teams or schools that were tied in the current seven leagues makes the point.

In the first three league games, league-leading teams averaged 40.3 points while holding other teams to 11.6 points a game.

Skating event

Great Skate Day is set for Nov. 11 at South Suburban Ice Arena and Family Sports Ice Arena.

There will be instructors on hand to discuss programs for beginners to experts and there will also be representatives from hockey associations and figure skating clubs, plus synchronized skating and Theater on Ice teams.

Activities at South Suburban, 6580 S. Vine St. in Centennial, will be from noon to 2 p.m. and from 1-3 p.m. at Family Sports, 6901 S. Peoria St. in Centennial

For information contact Gerry Lane at gerryl@ssprd.org.

Jim Benton is a sports writer for Colorado Community Media. He has been covering sports in the Denver area since 1968. He can be reached at jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia.com or at 303-566-4083.

No Comments

Know the 10 signs of the Alzheimer’s checklist

Jim Herlihy

Jim Herlihy

Tina Wells

Tina Wells

Living and Aging Well: Column by Jim Herlihy and Tina Wells

As we age, it is tempting to attribute all of the gradual changes our bodies go through — including our changes in memory — to the normal process of aging. There are some changes that we should be more attentive to, including those memory lapses that begin to affect our quality of life.

The Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado has developed a helpful checklist of 10 signs to aid in the early detection of Alzheimer’s. Why is early detection important? Without it, the ones we love may wait too long to make necessary lifestyle changes that are important to ensure that all medical care options are explored, ranging from medications to research. Other considerations include personal safety as well as quality of care, and to make necessary financial and estate planning adjustments.

Here is a brief overview of the 10 signs:

1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life. A typical age-related memory change is occasionally forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later. A common sign of Alzheimer’s disease, especially in the early stages, is forgetting recently learned information. The increasing need to rely on memory aids (reminder notes, electronic devices) or family members for things that one previously handled on their own is a sign.

2. Challenges in planning or solving problems. Making occasional errors, such as checkbook balancing, is not uncommon. If a person experiences changes in the ability to follow a plan or work with numbers, or has difficulty concentrating and completing a task, that may be a concern.

3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks. People with Alzheimer’s often find it hard to complete daily tasks. They may have trouble driving to a familiar location, managing a budget, or remembering the rules of a familiar game.

4. Confusion with time or place. Losing track of dates, seasons and the passage of time is another indication. Sometimes people with Alzheimer’s can forget where they are or how they got there.

5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships. For some individuals, vision problems can be a sign of Alzheimer’s. They may have difficulty reading, judging distance and determining color or contrast, which may cause problems with driving.

6. New problems with words in speaking or writing. People with Alzheimer’s may have trouble following or joining a conversation. They may struggle with vocabulary, have problems finding the right word or call things by the wrong name (such as, calling a “watch” a “hand clock”).

7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps. Putting things in unusual places and being unable to find them. Sometimes, they may accuse others of stealing – with more frequency over time.

8. Decreased or poor judgment. People with Alzheimer’s may use poor judgment when dealing with money, giving large amounts to telemarketers. They may also pay less attention to grooming and personal cleanliness.

9. Withdrawal from work or social activities. Some individuals may avoid being social because of changes they’re experiencing, removing themselves from work projects, hobbies and sports.

10. Changes in mood and personality. Increased incidences of confusion, suspicion, depression, fear or anxiety can be a sign. Individuals can become more easily upset at home, work, with friends or in places where they are out of their comfort zone.

If you or someone you care about is experiencing any of the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease, please see your doctor to explore the cause. Early diagnosis is an important step in seeking treatment and planning for your future.

For more information, contact the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline at 800-272-3900. For other matters, the Denver office of the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado can be reached at 303-813-1669. Jim Herlihy is the marketing and communications director at the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado and Tina Wells is the director of education and outreach. This column is hosted by the Seniors’ Council of Douglas County, which invites readers to its next meeting on at 9:30 a.m. Dec. 7 in the hearing room at the Douglas County Government Building, 100 Third Street, Castle Rock. A holiday reception with refreshments will follow the meeting. For more information, please visit MyDougCoSeniorLife.com, email DCSeniorLife@douglas.co.us or call 303-663-7681.

No Comments

Love yesterday, today and tomorrow — an integral, relevant, powerful force

Column by Michael Norton

Thank you in advance for reading this column. I sure do appreciate all of the emails feedback, what an awesome community we have. I hope you will join me for the next few weeks as this is the first of a three-part series: Love, Happiness, and Success. And today we begin with love.

“Duty makes us do things well, but love makes us do them beautifully” — Zig Ziglar

This is one of my favorite quotes by Zig. Many times when we think about love, oftentimes we can get caught up in only thinking about love in the romantic sense, and as a hopeless romantic myself, I totally get that. But there are so many other ways in which love has played such an integral part of our past, and where love is so very relevant to our present and our future. Love yesterday, love today and love tomorrow, so very powerful.

I am certain that if we think back to different times in our lives, we can very clearly see where love played a critical role in our own growth and development, our feelings, the encouragement of others and in the way we have done things in our own life. I am certain we can look back on the many people in our lives who showed us love, and we remember them with great fondness and appreciation. They were not “in love” with us, but they loved us, loved on us and took great care of us physically, mentally and emotionally. They have loved us enough to lead us spiritually too.

But what about the people we were “in-love” with? Are we still in love with them? Can we remember what being in love felt like and why we fell in love? If we still possess those feelings, that is awesome. Sometimes however, we forget too quickly or slowly, over time we can become complacent when it comes to those “in love” feelings. Maybe we don’t see it or feel it coming from the other person, or maybe we have stopped showing the same amount of “in love” feelings ourselves. What was it that we did yesterday and why and when did we slow down or stop? What has been the impact on our relationships? Whatever it is, let’s look now through new loving and re-energized eyes and hearts.

The good news is that today, right now in the present, we can offer love to others. We can help others, love on others, bless others, hug others, listen to others and show our love and appreciation today and every day. Whatever we used to do, we should start doing again. Not just for the people we love in our lives, but also for the people we are “in love” with in our lives. Today we can look at the people whom we love and who love us, and we can look at that person whom we are “in love” with through the same eyes that we did and with the same heart we had yesterday. Today is a day that can and should be filled with love. Today and every day.

The better news is that tomorrow brings with it even more opportunities to love on our family and friends in new and creative ways. All of our tomorrows in life provide us with opportunities to grow deeper “in love” regardless of the brevity or length of our relationships. It is so wonderful to see new love and the energy and bright eyes of hope and wonder as couples look to the future. And it is maybe even more incredible to watch love, true love, in people who have been together for decades. The spark is still there, the eyes express deep love, hands are held, affection is shown, car doors are opened, flowers are given, and love abounds as they remember the love of yesterday, the power of love in the present, and the hope of love in all of the tomorrows that are yet to come.

So how about you? When you think about all of the love in your life — past, present and future — and when you think about the feeling of being “in love,” does it give you a swoop in your heart and butterflies in your stomach? I hope so, and I would love to hear all about your love stories at gotonorton@gmail.com. Remember this, and please apply all of those things that love inspired yesterday, today and tomorrow. Because when we do, it really will be a better than good week.

Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the former president of the Zig Ziglar Corporation, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

No Comments

We need to apologize for this sorry state of affairs

Column by Craig Marshall Smith

Brenda Lee’s comin’ on strong. I’m sorry, so sorry, please accept my apology.

For what I said in the high school cafeteria to Dottie Danford.

For what I said in the art building elevator at UCLA to Magenta O’Toole.

For what I said at an art reception 30 years ago to one of my students.

Apologies — almost all of them coming from men — are flying around like locusts. One begets another out of someone else, out of someone else, out of someone else.

The male animal isn’t looking so good right now. Men are apologizing for things they said or did when Truman was in office.

Apologies in the moment count the most. Going back decades reminds me of the joke about the farmer’s new scarecrow.

I’ll get to that.

I am outspoken. I forgot to pick up my filter at the cleaners. It’s been there for about 10 years.

I am blunt, I blurt, I often don’t speak softly. Sometimes it’s called for.

We tried a gelato for the first time. It comes in a twist-top container. The twist-top didn’t twist.

I used jar openers on it, I tapped it with a spoon. Finally, I took a hammer to it, and loosened the top.

I expressed myself to the home office down there in Texas.

It’s almost impossible to say or write anything without offending someone somewhere.

I might have offended Brenda Lee for getting her involved in this.

If that’s true, I’m sorry. Lee (1944) was the top-selling (solo) female vocalist in the 1960s. “Little Miss Dynamite” is 4 feet 9 inches.

One of her hits, “Comin’ on Strong,” is referred to in Golden Earring’s song “Radar Love.”

I’m sorry about all of these song references, but I can’t help myself.

I am not going to mention you-know-whom, who is the most talked-about offender right now.

Or you-know-whom, who paid someone $32 million not to blab about his indiscretions.

Or you-know-whom, who used to perform comedy at the defunct Turn of the Century nightclub on East Hampden.

There are crimes in all of this, and there are misdemeanors.

Stepping on someone’s toes, physically or philosophically, happens all of the time to all of us.

You’re having a bad day, and it shows up in a barbed comment to a co-worker.

“Why did I say that?”

I know someone who can be judgmental and you don’t even know it. I don’t know how she does it. She is tactfully doubtful, and tactfully critical.

The only thing I have going for me is humor. I try to throw a little humor into it whenever I complain.

The lawn service wanted $136 an hour to clean up the leaves in my backyard.

I told them what I could get for $136 an hour. Please use your imagination. Otherwise, I would have to apologize to my team, the organization, and the community.

Here’s something I learned after the incident with the student.

Don’t ruin a good apology with a bad excuse.

If you are late, apologize for being late, and leave it at that.

“The dog ate my car keys” implicates the dog, and then you have to apologize to the dog.

The farmer’s new scarecrow was so effective that crows were returning corn they had stolen years and years ago.

Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

No Comments

Wondering about Trick or Treat Street? Read this update.

It’s almost Halloween, and you might be making plans, so we wanted to make sure you had updated information on Trick or Treat Street. We will not be hosting this event this year.

The Town knows this annual event has been a family favorite, and it’s been a joy to coordinate this fun event in partnership with the Downtown Merchants Association. As Downtown transforms this summer, much of the traditional Trick or Treat Street area is under construction, and safety is our top priority.

When Festival Park and other Downtown improvements are completed, we’ll brainstorm what this event might look like in the future.

In the meantime, The Downtown Merchants Association has worked with business owners for fun Halloween day activities and specials. Check out their Facebook page at Facebook.com/DowntownCastleRock.

Trick-or treating in neighborhoods is not regulated by the Town; however some HOAs may have guidelines. Please check with your local HOA. 

Have a fun and safe Halloween!

No Comments

Going paperless could pay off for Castle Rock Water customers

For years, Castle Rock residents have proven they are a community that cares about conservation. Collectively, Castle Rock Water customers have cut back consumption by more than 20 percent. Now, the department is asking customers to take those conservation efforts to a new level by cutting back in another way – paper.

Just as every drop of water counts, so does every piece of paper. Castle Rock Water is asking customers to embrace the call to conserve and sign up for paperless billing. Signing up to go paperless will help customers stay organized and assist the Town in better serving the community. Plus, customers who sign up before Nov. 30 will be entered to win a $50 water credit on their next water bill.

In 2014, Castle Rock Water launched a new online bill pay solution to help customers better connect with their water bill. Since then, customers have adopted the H2OAccess system, and about 53 percent of current customers have signed up for online billing. H2OAccess provides customers with 24/7 account access, along with an email reminder when their statements are available online.

Now, Castle Rock Water wants customers to take online efficiency one step further and sign up for paperless billing. If every customer went paperless, the Town would save money in both printing and postage costs. That’s money that could be used to provide better service to customers.

It’s important to remember, even if customers have an H2OAccess account, they may not be signed up for paperless billing. The $50 water credit drawing will take place the week of Dec. 4. Current paperless customers will also be entered into the drawing.

By opting to go paperless, customers will save time, stay organized and help the environment. More information is online at CRgov.com/H2OAccess.

Get Town news straight to your inbox. Sign up online at CRgov.com/notifyme, or follow the Town on Facebook (facebook.com/CRgov), Twitter (@CRgov) and LinkedIn (search Town of Castle Rock).

No Comments

Council chooses next neighborhood park location

As Castle Rock thrives, it’s important for the Town to maintain its service levels. Following Town Council approval Tuesday, a new neighborhood park will soon give residents in one of the Town’s fastest-growing areas a new place to play.

Town Council on Tuesday unanimously agreed on the location of the next neighborhood park – Meadows F18 Lot 2, which is located along Low Meadow Boulevard, next to Aspen View Academy.

Funding for new neighborhood parks comes from development fees, which is separate from funding for park maintenance and renovation. As a result, new parks are located in higher-growth areas.

With this in mind, the Town started this selection process with a list of five sites to consider: Terrain Lot 2, Castlewood Ranch Tract L, Cobblestone Ranch Tract L, Crystal Valley South/Park School and Meadows F18 Lot 2. Each site was evaluated based on standard criteria, and the list was presented to the public in August.  

Evaluation criteria included: existing public and private recreation amenities within the service area, access to open space and trails, anticipated development cost, recreation programming potential, population and the operational budget impact.

More than 540 residents responded to an online questionnaire regarding the future park’s location, and nearly 60 percent of the online respondents supported The Meadows location. In addition, more than two dozen people attended two open houses and provided feedback.

It’s important to note that the Town is planning to build a park at each of the five initially considered sites over the next several years, depending on the pace of growth. Current estimates indicate the Town will build a new neighborhood park every two to three years. Council will be charged with determining the order in which they will be built.

Now, the Town will seek bids and begin the design process. Public input will be a key part of this process, too. Stay up-to-date with this process at CRgov.com/FutureParks.

No Comments

Learn about the next steps for choosing the next neighborhood park

Part of what makes Castle Rock a great place for families is having many places to play. Already, the Town boasts 20 neighborhood parks. In 2018, one more will swing into construction. But before construction can begin, a site must be chosen.

Since August, the Castle Rock Parks and Recreation Department has been gathering resident feedback through the “Pick a Park” campaign. Now, that feedback and staff analysis will be presented to Town Council, along with a recommended site.

Council is set to consider this information and give the Parks and Recreation Department direction on next steps during its regular meeting Tuesday, Oct. 17. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers at Town Hall, 100 N. Wilcox St.

Funding for new neighborhood parks comes from development fees, which is separate from funding for park maintenance and renovation. As a result, new parks will be located in higher growth areas.

With this in mind, the Town started this selection process with a list of five sites to consider: Terrain Lot 2, Castlewood Ranch Tract L, Cobblestone Ranch Tract L, Crystal Valley South/Park School and Meadows F18 Lot 2. Each site was evaluated based on standard criteria, and the list was presented to the public.  

Evaluation criteria included: existing public and private recreation amenities within the service area, access to open space and trails, anticipated development cost, recreation programming potential, population and the operational budget impact.

More than 540 residents responded to the Town’s online survey regarding the future park’s location. In addition, more than two dozen people attended two open houses and provided feedback.

Using that feedback and evaluation criteria, staff is recommending Meadows F18 Lot 2, which is located along Prairie Hawk Drive, next to Aspen View Academy. Nearly 60 percent of the online survey supported that location.

It’s important to note that the Town is planning to build a park at each of these sites over the next several years, depending on the pace of growth. Current estimates indicate the Town will build a new neighborhood park every two to three years. Council will be charged with determining the order in which they will be built.

After Council decides on the next park’s location, the Town will seek bids and begin the design process. Public input will be a key part of this process, too. Stay up-to-date with this process at CRgov.com/FutureParks.

No Comments

Bake a pie or devour a slice at Castle Rock’s inaugural pie baking competition

Bake a pie or devour a slice at Castle Rock’s inaugural pie baking competition

It’s that festive time of year where families gather around to enjoy good company, hearty food, and most importantly, pie! Do you have what it takes to rise to the occasion? Don’t be afraid to take whisks. Join us 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Millhouse at Philip S. Miller Park for the Town’s inaugural pie baking competition.

The Pie Bake-off is open to all bakers. There will be two categories for judging: fruit and non-fruit pies. Pies will be assessed based on appearance, crust, filling and overall flavor and taste.

Registration is now open. Visit CRgov.com/registration and scan for class No. 30099. There is a $25 entry fee and the event will be limited to 50 contestants.

Judging will begin at 11:30 a.m. Following the judging, all pies will be sold by the slice and whole pies will be auctioned off. Want to gobble-up some great pie? You are in luck as you can buy a pie from one of Castle Rock’s finest pie bakers. Bring the whole family to Castle Rock’s pie extravaganza, along with your appetite.

Learn more about the Pie Bake-off at CRgov.com/pies.

Get Town news straight to your inbox. Sign up online at CRgov.com/notifyme, or follow the Town on Facebook (facebook.com/CRgov), Twitter (@CRgov), Instagram (CRGOV) and LinkedIn (search Town of Castle Rock).

No Comments